‘Jordan Commerce’ Rejects Social Health Insurance Proposition

تم نشره في Sun 20 November / Nov 2016. 12:00 AM
  • From the meet between the Jordan Chamber of Commerce, representatives of the Commercial sector, and the Social Security Corporation - (From Source)

AMMAN —Al Ghad— The Jordan Chamber of Commerce (JCC), in a meeting Saturday afternoon with heads and representatives of the Jordanian chambers of commerce and a Social Security Corporation (SSC) delegation rejected the Corporation’s proposition to launch the Social Health Insurance Programme, which deducts 2.5 per cent off corporate revenues to support the social health insurance network.

On their part, the SSC confirms that the proposition is still under review, and that no decision has been made so far in regards to implementation, nor to the adoption of the mechanism itself.

In detail, the programme proposes 3 main suggestions for general implementation: first, that the Social Health Insurance (SHI) service be provided via the Ministry of Health (MOH)’s medical and health centres and hospitals only, with 10 per cent deductible from employees’ monthly salaries; 3 per cent off their pay, with a dynamic ceiling of JOD30, 5 per cent incurred on employers, and 2 per cent carried by the State.

Second, the provision of a vaster network, inclusive of the Private medical sector, by which medical treatment at private hospitals can be provided to insured citizens in accordance to the agreed pricings by the MOH, with the same carry-cost distribution in the first suggestion.

The third suggestion is that medical service be also provided via the medical outlets of the MOH and the Royal Medical Services, in addition to private sector establishments, with a 13 per cent subscription rate, a carry cost of 3 per cent for employees, at a dynamic ceiling of JOD50, 6 per cent carried by employers, and 4.5 per cent carried by the state.

JCC Chairman Senator Nael Kabariti said that the decision will negatively affect several sectors within the commercial and service industries, including insurance companies and private hospitals, with the domestic business sector barely afloat, in light of suffocating economic conditions.

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