Netanyahu’s Corruption

By Fahed Khitan

تم نشره في Mon 4 September / Sep 2017. 11:00 PM
  • Fahed Khitan

The noose is tightening around the neck of Israeli Prime Minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, more and more by the day, as this pompous rightist and his wife face a flood of endless corruption cases.

Six influential military and economic personnel, within Netanyahu’s tighter circles have been detained in the ongoing investigations into the German submarines deal.

Moshe Yaalon, the former Defence Minister who was overthrown by Netanyahu for opposing the deal, just gave his testimony in court.

Likely, it will have a significant effect on the progress of investigations.

So far, the court has delayed the arrest of one of Netanyahu’s two former office directors, and arrested the other. Ari Harow, who’s now an asset witness in the investigation, collaborated and gave a strong statement; “fundamental” to the case, according to Israeli media.

However, Netanyahu’s corruption goes beyond just the subs deal. His involvement is now confirmed in a previous case, wherein it is said that he made thousands of dollars in gifts off of a business deal.

Also, it was also proven that the corrupt Prime Minister had frequently interfered in the affairs of far-right newspaper, Israel Hayom. He made hundreds of calls to its owner and editor-in-chief in an attempt to formulate a joint framework to support Netanyahu’s government policies.

This too is considered corruption, according to Israeli law.

As for his very influential wife, she was just served a list of charges, ranging from fraud to embezzlement, by the police; her third list of charges yet.

This fraudulent women is up to her ears in corruption.

Needless to say, Netanyahu is a fraud. A pompous, corrupt excuse for a politician.

Many times he escaped justice.

More so, his long resume shows he never thinks twice when there’s money involved, even if it meant exploiting public office. Let alone employing his relations with businessmen to consolidate power.

Netanyahu has landed himself in quite a hole.

In fact, he may very well end up in the same prison as his wife, whose sight he cannot bear.

This time, however, his predicament is doubly dangerous; he may escape legal penalisation, but he may end up losing his political office.

Even worse, his party may lose the upcoming Knesset elections.

This is why Netanyahu is trying to raise his rates by compensating for these scandals with preposterous PR stunts, and it kind of worked.

It actually gave extremists there a momentum and raised the tone of hostility against Palestinians.

Naturally, there is no better, shorter way to rebuild popularity in Israel than to appeal to the Zionists’ hate.

Never will Netanyahu ever be as dangerous as he will be in the upcoming few months.

He will not hesitate to do whatever he has to do, no matter how stupid, to remain in power.

Politically, he will rival the most the terroristic settlers, and will work hard to bring the US initiative to revive negotiations on the Two-State basis to the ground.

He will back settlement schemes and Judisation without hesitation, especially in Occupied Jerusalem.

Militarily too, he will not think twice, if he should see it in his favour, to wage war on Gaza, in order to corner the Palestinian Authority.

There is absolutely no doubt that Netanyahu is obsessed with authority and power, and was always good propagating fear among the Israelis. Especially when it comes to external threats to their very existence. This is how he was voted into office, as the politician most concerned with the Israelis’ security and stability.

Regionally, Iran has always been Netanyahu’s favourite enemy. Under such regional and domestic conditions, he will also resort to Iran’s threat, in order to popularise support against his prosecution.

Who knows, he may actually go to instigating a military confrontation with Iran in Syria.

Should this happen, the whole region will slip into the abyss.

Netanyahu is cornered, like a boxed cat, when even a mouse grows fangs when stuck in a corner.

This article is an edited translation of the Arabic version, published by AlGhad.

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