Why does the opposition fail?

تم نشره في Sun 8 March / Mar 2015. 06:32 PM

By Fahd Khitan

 

The disappointment of the Arab peoples with their opposition almost exceeded their disappointment with their regimes, whether in countries where revolutions triumphed or those that are still struggling to gain their freedom.

Libya, which has suffered from dictatorship and tyranny for nearly four decades, after the revolution turned into a failed state where opposition forces are jostling for power and influence. In the vortex of this conflict, Libya is approaching disintegration its people who die today are more than it what it was during the rule of dysfunctional colonel.

In Syria, where the spin deadly war, opposition there turned into a farce; factions vying for external loyalty, and buys and sells Brigades fighters simpletons. The number of dead in the internal wars than what falls in confrontations with the forces of order. All this is happening and is still the "revolution" has yet to win. How to be the case if the regime fell and condemned her control? What will happen to the Syrians then?

In Syria, where the there is an ongoing deadly war, the opposition turned into a farce; factions vying for external loyalty, buying and selling simpleton fighters. The number of dead in the internal wars is more than what falls in confrontations with the forces of the regime. All this is happening and is still the "revolution" has yet to win. What would happen if the regime falls and it has control? What will happen to the Syrians then?

Opposition in the Arab world, such as many regimes, are not worthy of the confidence of the masses; they failed after they came to power, and sometimes before they got there.

Tunisia is an exception, but the general picture is that did the situation in countries that have not seen a revolutionary change is a little bit better off than their counterparts in the countries of the "Arab Spring”.

Here's the puzzling question: Why do the opposition in our countries fail when given the chance to govern?

Researchers can list dozens of reasons to diagnose the opposition crisis, and that has become obvious to all because of how much it has been repeated in discussions of intellectuals in the post-Arab Spring stage. However, we are still puzzled and feel that there is an ambiguity that prevents our understanding of what is going on. Otherwise, how do we explain the persistence of the crisis as long as the causes are known?!

Politicians and researchers say that the chaos stage of change must pass by, before the stability and democratic transformation stage.

This may be true, but can an opposition that turns its country into a battle of civil war have the confidence of the people in the future?

In countries such as Libya and Yemen, the opposition won every possible support from home and abroad, but failed to invest to build a national consensus and safely cross the transitional phase, similar to the experiences of democratization in Eastern Europe.

The experience of popular revolutions in the Arab world failed to simulate all the previous models: Latin America, Eastern Europe, and the experiences of the change in Asian countries.

Results do indicate that we are undergoing some passing chaos that will stabilize. If it is as such, it will be a stability that corresponds the situation before a revolution. In Yemen, the "colonel" raises his head again. In Libya, the "brigade" almost holds the reins of power. In Egypt, the officers had what they wanted. In Syria, however, many of brigades and colonels are jostling for power.

There are Arab regimes that have withstood decades before their collapse, while the opposition lost the confidence of the people before they even sat on the chairs to rule.

@fahed_khitan

 

This article is an edited translation from the Arabic edition

Comment